CCNA Blueprint

1.0 Operation of IP Data Networks

1.1 Recognize the purpose and functions of various network devices such as routers, switches, bridges and hubs

1.2 Select the components required to meet a given network specification

1.3 Identify common applications and their impact on the network

1.4 Describe the purpose and basic operation of the protocols in the OSI and TCP/IP models

1.5 Predict the data flow between two hosts across a network

1.6 Identify the appropriate media, cables, ports, and connectors to connect Cisco network devices to other network devices and hosts in a LAN

2.0 LAN Switching  Technologies

2.1 Determine the technology and media access control method for Ethernet networks2.2 Identify basic switching concepts and the operation of Cisco switches

  • 2.2.a Collision Domains
  • 2.2.b Broadcast Domains
  • 2.2.c Ways to switch
    • 2.2.c [i] Store
    • 2.2.c [ii] Forward
    • 2.2.c [iii] Cut through
  • 2.2.d CAM Table

2.3 Configure and verify initial switch configuration including remote access management

  • 2.3.a hostname
  • 2.3.b mgmt IP address
  • 2.3.c IP default-gateway
  • 2.3.d local user and password
  • 2.3.e enable secret password
  • 2.3.f console and VTY logins
  • 2.3.g exec-timeout
  • 2.3.h service password encryption
  • 2.3.i copy run start

2.4 Verify network status and switch operation using basic utilities such as

  • 2.4.a ping
  • 2.4.b telnet
  • 2.4.c SSH

2.5 Describe how VLANs create logically separate networks and the need for routing between them

  • 2.5.a Explain network segmentation and basic traffic management concepts

2.6 Configure and verify VLANs

2.7 Configure and verify trunking on Cisco switches

  • 2.7.a dtp (topic)
  • 2.7.b auto-negotiation

2.8 Identify enhanced switching technologies

  • 2.8.a RSTP
  • 2.8.b PVSTP
  • 2.8.c Etherchannels

2.9 Configure and verify PVSTP operation

  • 2.9.a Describe root bridge election
  • 2.9.b Spanning tree mode

3.0 IP Addressing  (IPv4/IPv6)

3.1 Describe the operation and necessity of using private and public IP addresses for IPv4 addressing3.2 Identify the appropriate IPv6 addressing scheme to satisfy addressing requirements in a LAN/WAN environment3.3 Identify the appropriate IPv4 addressing scheme using VLSM and summarization to satisfy addressing requirements in a LAN/WAN environment.3.4 Describe the technological requirements for running IPv6 in conjunction with IPv4

  • 3.4.a dual stack

3.5 Describe IPv6 addresses

  • 3.5.a global unicast
  • 3.5.b multicast
  • 3.5.c link local
  • 3.5.d unique local
  • 3.5.e eui 64
  • 3.5.f auto-configuration

4.0 IP Routing  Technologies

4.1 Describe basic routing concepts

  • 4.1.a packet forwarding
  • 4.1.b router lookup process
  • 4.1.c Process Switching/Fast Switching/CEF

4.2 Configure and verify utilizing the CLI to set basic Router configuration

  • 4.2.a hostname
  • 4.2.b local user and password
  • 4.2.c enable secret password
  • 4.2.d console and VTY logins
  • 4.2.e exec-timeout
  • 4.2.f service password encryption
  • 4.2.g Interface IP Address
    • 4.2.g [i] loopback
  • 4.2.h banner
  • 4.2.i motd
  • 4.2.j copy run start

4.3 Configure and verify operation status of a device interface

  • 4.3.a Serial
  • 4.3.b Ethernet

4.4 Verify router configuration and network connectivity using

  • 4.4.a ping
    • 4.4.a [i] extended
  • 4.4.b traceroute
  • 4.4.c telnet
  • 4.4.d SSH
  • 4.4.e sh cdp neighbors

4.5 Configure and verify routing configuration for a static or default route given specific routing requirements

4.6 Differentiate methods of routing and routing protocols

  • 4.6.a Static versus Dynamic
  • 4.6.b Link state versus Distance Vector
  • 4.6.c next hop
  • 4.6.d ip routing table
  • 4.6.e Passive Interfaces (how they work)
  • 4.6.f Admin Distance
  • 4.6.g split horizon
  • 4.6.h metric

4.7 Configure and verify OSPF

  • 4.7.a Benefit of single area
  • 4.7.b Configure OSPv2
  • 4.7.c Configure OSPv3
  • 4.7.d Router ID
  • 4.7.e Passive Interface
  • 4.7.f Discuss multi-area OSPF
  • 4.7.g Understand LSA types and purpose

4.8 Configure and verify interVLAN routing (Router on a stick)

  • 4.8.a sub interfaces
  • 4.8.b upstream routing
  • 4.8.c encapsulation

4.9 Configure SVI interfaces

4.10 Manage Cisco IOS Files

  • 4.10.a Boot Preferences
  • 4.10.b Cisco IOS Images (15)
  • 4.10.c Licensing
    • 4.10.c [i] Show license
    • 4.10.c [ii] Change license

4.11 Configure and verify EIGRP (single AS)

  • 4.11.a Feasible Distance/Feasible Successors/Administrative distance
  • 4.11.b Feasibility condition
  • 4.11.c Metric composition
  • 4.11.d Router ID
  • 4.11.e auto summary
  • 4.11.f Path Selection
  • 4.11.g Load Balancing
    • 4.11.g [i] Unequal
    • 4.11.g [ii] Equal

5.0 IP Services

5.1 Configure and verify DHCP (IOS Router)

  • 5.1.a Configuring router interfaces to use DHCP
  • 5.1.b DHCP options (basic overview and functionality)
  • 5.1.c Excluded addresses
  • 5.1.d Lease time

5.2 Describe the types, features, and applications of ACLs

  • 5.2.a standard (editing and sequence numbers)
  • 5.2.b extended
  • 5.2.c named
  • 5.2.d numbered
  • 5.2.e Log option

5.3 Configure and verify ACLs in a network environment

  • 5.3.a named
  • 5.3.b numbered
  • 5.3.c Log option

5.4 Identify the basic operation of NAT

  • 5.4.a purpose
  • 5.4.b pool
  • 5.4.c static
  • 5.4.d 1 to 1
  • 5.4.e overloading
  • 5.4.f source addressing
  • 5.4.g one way NAT

5.5 Configure and verify NAT for given network requirements

5.6 Configure and verify NTP as a client.

5.7 Recognize High availability (FHRP)

  • 5.7.a VRRP
  • 5.7.b HSRP
  • 5.7.c GLBP

5.8 Configure and verify syslog

  • 5.8.a Utilize Syslog Output

5.9 Describe SNMP v2 and v3

6.0 Network Device  Security

6.1 Configure and verify network device security features

  • 6.1.a Device password security
  • 6.1.b enable secret versus enable
  • 6.1.c Transport
  • 6.1.c.1 disable telnet
  • 6.1.c.2 SSH
  • 6.1.d VTYs
  • 6.1.e physical security
  • 6.1.f service password
  • 6.1.g Describe external authentication methods

6.2 Configure and verify Switch Port Security

  • 6.2.a Sticky mac
  • 6.2.b MAC address limitation
  • 6.2.c static/dynamic
  • 6.2.d violation modes
    • 6.2.d [i] err disable
    • 6.2.d [ii] shutdown
    • 6.2.d [iii] protect restrict
  • 6.2.e shutdown unused ports
  • 6.2.f err disable recovery
  • 6.2.g assign unused ports in unused VLANs
  • 6.2.h putting Native VLAN to other than VLAN 1

6.3 Configure and verify ACLs to filter network traffic

6.4 Configure and verify ACLs to limit telnet and SSH access to the router

7.0 Troubleshooting

7.1 Troubleshoot and correct common problems associated with IP addressing and host configurations7.2 Troubleshoot and resolve VLAN problems

  • 7.2.a Identify that VLANs are configured
  • 7.2.b Verify port membership correct
  • 7.2.c Correct IP address configured

7.3 Troubleshoot and resolve trunking problems on Cisco switches

  • 7.3.a Verify correct trunk states
  • 7.3.b Verify correct encapsulation configured
  • 7.3.c Correct VLANs allowed

7.4 Troubleshoot and resolve ACL issues

  • 7.4.a Verify statistics
  • 7.4.b Verify permitted networks
  • 7.4.c Verify direction
    • 7.4.c [i] Interface

7.5 Troubleshoot and resolve Layer 1 problems

  • 7.5.a Framing
  • 7.5.b CRC
  • 7.5.c Runts
  • 7.5.d Giants
  • 7.5.e Dropped packets
  • 7.5.f Late collisions
  • 7.5.g Input/output errors

7.6 Identify and correct common network problems

7.7 Troubleshoot and resolve spanning tree operation issues

  • 7.7.a Verify root switch
  • 7.7.b Verify priority
  • 7.7.c Verify mode is correct
  • 7.7.d Verify port states

7.8 Troubleshoot and resolve routing issues

  • 7.8.a Verify routing is enabled (sh IP protocols)
  • 7.8.b Verify routing table is correct
  • 7.8.c Verify correct path selection

7.9 Troubleshoot and resolve OSPF problems

  • 7.9.a Verify neighbor adjacencies
  • 7.9.b Verify Hello and Dead timers
  • 7.9.c Verify OSPF area
  • 7.9.d Verify interface MTU
  • 7.9.e Verify network types
  • 7.9.f Verify neighbor states
  • 7.9.g Review OSPF topology table

7.10 Troubleshoot and resolve EIGRP problems

  • 7.10.a Verify neighbor adjacencies
  • 7.10.b Verify AS number
  • 7.10.c Verify load balancing
  • 7.10.d Split horizon

7.11 Troubleshoot and resolve interVLAN routing problems

  • 7.11.a Verify connectivity
  • 7.11.b Verify encapsulation
  • 7.11.c Verify subnet
  • 7.11.d Verify native VLAN
  • 7.11.e Port mode trunk status

7.12 Troubleshoot and resolve WAN implementation issues

  • 7.12.a Serial interfaces
  • 7.12.b Frame relay
  • 7.12.c PPP

7.13 Monitor NetFlow statistics

7.14 TS EtherChannel problems

8.0 WAN Technologies

8.1 Identify different WAN technologies

  • 8.1.a Metro ethernet
  • 8.1.b VSAT
  • 8.1.c Cellular 3g/4g
  • 8.1.d MPLS
  • 8.1.e T1/E1
  • 8.1.f ISDN
  • 8.1.g DSL
  • 8.1.h Frame relay
  • 8.1.i Cable
  • 8.1.j VPN

8.2 Configure and verify a basic WAN serial connection

8.3 Configure and verify a PPP connection between Cisco routers

8.4 Configure and verify Frame Relay on Cisco routers

8.5 Implement and troubleshoot PPPoE

Get on CLN and get on VIRL

34. Re: Cisco Live Vegas

Jack Jan 22, 2016 12:06 PM (in response to arteq)

CLN/CLUS-LV meet up would be awesome! Please keep me in the loop.

 

One of the reasons i purchased VIRL was based on your youtube videos! So hopefully you’ll keep them coming!

I still have affection for GNS3, it’s where i “grew up” in terms of Cisco. I wouldn’t have obtained my CCNA without it. But the limits of GNS3 affected my CCNP Switch studies, so I had to spend the money.. But I don’t regret the decision!

Do you know where to find any CCNP Switch-VIRL labs? (without a price tag). Just a stab in the dark on that one!

CCNP SWITCH 300-115 2.1 Configure and verify switch security features

2.1.a DHCP snooping

In this segment we will cover DHCP, as well as DHCP Snooping. It seems the blueprint is remiss in mentioning DHCP in its own line item so we will briefly cover it here as you cannot have DHCP Snooping without DHCP.

DHCP is easy enough; there are only 2 requirements for it so long as you are using a single subnet, as we will do here for the sake of simplicity. The minimum requirements call for a default-router and a DHCP network for address assignment. You could establish a lease period, DNS, and many other delimiters,  but they are not minimum requirements. It is a good idea to include a domain-name but usually that has already been configured.

DHCP is the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. It eases administration by allowing clients to broadcast for Ip addresses and a default gateway, among other parameters. A lot easier than statically configuring a bunch of windows or linux boxes in any size environment. The usual method is for a dedicated server to handle the chore, but Cisco was kind enough to include it in its routers and switches, and on it’s exams.

So the first step  will be to set up a DHCP server. Keep in mind the acronym DORA, dis, off, req, ack and you can easily memorize the dhcp process. Discover, Offer, Request, Acknowledge.

Option 82 or the information option is a player in the VIRL canvas. Option 82 is turned on by default and does further fact checking for validity on untrusted ports especially in the case of relays. We can avoid this by turning off option 82 at the switch, or by enabling option 82 on the access ports, the untrusted ports, however, here we will turn it off on the switch. You can find out more detail about option 82 on the internet, in fact Petr Lapukhov has a great article about it on his INE blog. Just do a search for “option 82 Petr” and that should be your first hit.

Let’s get down to configuration.

Now that we have DHCP in place and operational, we can talk about DHCP Snooping. DHCP Snooping is designed to disallow rogue DHCP servers from inhabiting your network and dishing out false Ip addresses and gateways to your clients. This is performed by establishing a trust between authorized devices and thereby building a reference database for cross checking. Remember, only untrusted connections will be leased ip addresses and assigned to the snooping database, along with their associated mac’s and vlan’s. It is vital to understand that trusted connections are established between server and switch or router and switch or switch and switch, not switch and access ports.

There are three essential items to get DHCP Snooping operational. Of course there are other options but we will discuss the minimum. They
are:

Turn on dhcp snooping

turn on dhcp snooping for the Vlan or Vlan’s

and establish trust between the server and switch.

here we go:

VIDEO

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pRDz-B_O8U

 

 

SWITCH 300-115 1.5 Configure and verify EtherChannels

1.5.d EtherChannel misconfiguration guard
Etherchannel misconfiguration guard is enabled by default and does what it says it does; helps prevent misconfiguration of etherchannels.
We know that the interfaces we bundle into a channel need to have matching configurations or they will not be suitable, but often enough they are mistakenly put together in a hurry without verifying both sides interfaces first. Etherchannel misconfiguration guard will place the channel in errdissable state and issues an error message if it detects a possible misconfiguration.
To verify that etherchannel guard misconfig is in place as the default use:
sh spann summ | i Ether
If you do break the etherchannel by purposely misconfiguring, or not, you can reenable the channel with shut/no shut or by adjusting the errdisable recovery time interval.
VIDEO