Monthly Archives: December 2015

1.5 Configure and verify EtherChannels

 

1.5.c Load balancing

by default load balancing is:

SW3#sh etherchannel load
EtherChannel Load-Balancing Configuration:
src-mac    

EtherChannel Load-Balancing Addresses Used Per-Protocol:
Non-IP: Source MAC address                                                      
  IPv4: Source MAC address                                                      
  IPv6: Source MAC address    

from Catalyst 3750 Switch Software Configuration Guide 1-8

EtherChannel balances the traffic load across the links in a channel by reducing part of the binary pattern formed from the addresses in the frame to a numerical value that selects one of the links in the channel.
EtherChannel load balancing can use MAC addresses or IP addresses, source or destination addresses, or both source and destination addresses. The selected mode applies to all EtherChannels configured on the switch. You configure the load balancing and forwarding method by using the port-channel load-balance global configuration command.

With source-MAC address forwarding, when packets are forwarded to an EtherChannel, they are distributed across the ports in the channel based on the source-MAC address of the incoming packet. Therefore, to provide load balancing, packets from different hosts use different ports in the channel, but packets from the same host use the same port in the channel.

With destination-MAC address forwarding, when packets are forwarded to an EtherChannel, they are distributed across the ports in the channel based on the destination host’s MAC address of the incoming packet. Therefore, packets to the same destination are forwarded over the same port, and packets to a different destination are sent on a different port in the channel.
With source-and-destination MAC address forwarding, when packets are forwarded to an EtherChannel, they are distributed across the ports in the channel based on both the source and destination MAC addresses.

This forwarding method, a combination source-MAC and destination-MAC address forwarding methods of load distribution, can be used if it is not clear whether source-MAC or destination-MAC address forwarding is better suited on a particular switch.

With source-and-destination MAC-address forwarding, packets sent from host A to host B, host A to host C, and host C to host B could all use different ports in the channel.
With source-IP address-based forwarding, when packets are forwarded to an EtherChannel, they are distributed across the ports in the EtherChannel based on the source-IP address of the incoming packet.
Therefore, to provide load-balancing, packets from different IP addresses use different ports in the channel, but packets from the same IP address use the same port in the channel.
With destination-IP address-based forwarding, when packets are forwarded to an EtherChannel, they are distributed across the ports in the EtherChannel based on the destination-IP address of the incoming packet. Therefore, to provide load-balancing, packets from the same IP source address sent to different IP destination addresses could be sent on different ports in the channel. But packets sent from different source IP addresses to the same destination IP address are always sent on the same port in the channel.
With source-and-destination IP address-based forwarding, packets are sent to an EtherChannel and distributed across the EtherChannel ports, based on both the source and destination IP addresses of the incoming packet. This forwarding method, a combination of source-IP and destination-IP address-based forwarding, can be used if it is not clear whether source-IP or destination-IP address-based forwarding is better suited on a particular switch. In this method, packets sent from the IP address A to IP address B, from IP address A to IP address C, and from IP address C to IP address B could all use different ports in the channel.

Different load-balancing methods have different advantages, and the choice of a particular
load-balancing method should be based on the position of the switch in the network and the kind of traffic that needs to be load-distributed.

SWITCH 300-115 1.5 Configure and verify EtherChannels

1.5.b Layer 2, Layer 3
Surprisingly, the Switch blueprint does not mention routed ports or SVI’s (switched virtual interfaces) specifically. However, in this section we get the first hint of Layer 3 on a switch so now is a good time to expound a bit. Naturally, the Certification Guides and  Foundation Learning Guides are indispensible throughout the certification process, and while the blueprint is a great road map, it may not mention everything. So you need a bit of everything and for that there is a whole internet out there to be had. So go forth and be all up inside the internet.
Multilayer switching is what it says it is; switches can support more layers than layer 2. Simply put, the switch is a router.
Multiple access ports can be assembled into one Vlan and share a common Gateway address to other layer 3 capable devices. This describes a Switched Virtual interface.
The three hallmarks of SVI creation are:
make a vlan
make an interface vlan, assign it an ip address and turn it up with no shut
and make sure to assign at least 1 port to the vlan.
By default an SVI is created for you, Vlan 1, you just need to give it an address, and you know by default all ports belong to Vlan 1 out of the box.
VIDEO