1.1.c Explain general network challenges

1.1.c [iii] Asymmetric routing

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What is Asymmetric Routing?

In Asymmetric routing, a packet traverses from a source to a destination in one path and takes a different path when it returns to the source. This is commonly seen in Layer-3 routed networks.

Issues to Consider with Asymmetric Routing

Asymmetric routing is not a problem by itself, but will cause problems when Network Address Translation (NAT) or firewalls are used in the routed path. For example, in firewalls, state information is built when the packets flow from a higher security domain to a lower security domain. The firewall will be an exit point from one security domain to the other. If the return path passes through another firewall, the packet will not be allowed to traverse the firewall from the lower to higher security domain because the firewall in the return path will not have any state information. The state information exists in the first firewall.